Introduction

In this tutorial, you will learn how to find full-text articles in Academic Search Premier (ASP) while discovering a variety of search techniques and features to refine your results.

This database is multidisciplinary and contains both scholarly and popular articles.

You’ll experience two research scenarios that highlight the scholarly and popular content in Academic Search Premier (ASP).

Use the arrows below to navigate sequentially through the tutorial or use the Contents button above to skip between sections.

If you are using an iPad, be sure to click the Full Site link before proceeding with this tutorial.

Part 1, Locating Scholarly Articles - Your Research Question

You’ve recently engaged in a rather controversial discussion with friends about ecotourism and wildlife conservation in Africa. You’ve decided to explore this topic a little further with the following research question.

In what ways does ecotourism affect wildlife conservation in Africa?

Identify Keywords

The first step is to identify keywords in your question. Keywords are the main words (or phrases) that represent your research question and will help you find relevant articles.

What are the most important keywords for your research question:

 

In what ways does ecotourism affect wildlife conservation in Africa? 

Searching ASP

Let’s try these keywords in a search.

1. Type these keywords into the ASP search box leaving a space between each of the search terms: ecotourism wildlife conservation Africa

2. Click Search

How many results did you find?

Searching ASP

The number of results at first glance may seem low but remember the research question is fairly specific.

Let’s make a slight revision to the search.

With the previous search the database was searching each of the keywords individually. However, in this scenario wildlife conservation should be searched as one phrase rather than two separate keywords. In other words, the two words take on a new meaning when put together.

Putting quotes around the phrase will ensure that the keywords get searched together as one concept, “wildlife conservation” not wildlife and conservation separately.

Revising Your Search

Let’s try the search again including the quotes around the phrase.

1. In the ASP search box type in the following (leaving a space between each word/phrase): ecotourism “wildlife conservation” Africa

2. Click Search

How many results did you get this time?

Refining Your Results to Full Text

You’ve probably noticed by now that not all your search results are full-text articles. Let’s try refining your results to full-text only.

In the left-hand navigation bar under Refine Results, click the box next to Full Text

How many results did you get when applying the full-text option?

Refining Your Results to Academic Journals

Let’s narrow the remaining results to academic journal articles.

In the left-hand navigation bar under Source Types, click the box next to Academic Journals

Now, you should have several full-text scholarly articles on your topic.

Accessing Full-Text Articles

To access the full-text articles, click on the links for either PDF Full Text or HTML Full Text to see the article. Once you have one of the articles open look to see what Tools are available to you (located to the far right on your screen).

You can print, email, or bookmark the article. Additionally, you can see multiple citation formats for the article as well as add it to your folder to save for a later time.

Part 2, Locating Popular Articles - Your Research Question

Now that you have experience locating scholarly articles, let’s try locating popular articles on another topic.

You’ve recently had a conversation with a coworker talking about ways to reduce stress in your life. Your coworker has asked you to find some popular articles on reducing workplace stress. Try the following research question.

In what ways can workplace stress be reduced?

Identify Keywords

As you'll remember from Part 1, the first step is to identify the keywords in your question. Reminder: Keywords are the main words (or phrases) that represent your research question and will help you find relevant articles.

What are the important keywords for your research question:

 

In what ways can workplace stress be reduced?

Searching ASP

Let’s try these keywords in a search.

1. Click Basic Search to start a new search

2. Type these keywords into the ASP search box leaving a space between each search term: stress reduced workplace

3. Click Search

How many results did you find?

Searching ASP

There are plenty of results with this search, but we’re only searching for articles with the word Reduced in it. It would be useful to search for multiple variations on the word such as Reduce, Reduction, or Reducing. In order for the database to search variations on a keyword you must use a search technique called truncation which is represented by an asterisk (*).

To use truncation you must use the root of your keyword search term and replace the ending with an asterisk (*).

In this case our keyword search term, Reduced, would be truncated like so reduc*

The database would then search all variations of the word.

Revising Your Search

Let’s try the search again using truncation.

1. In the ASP search box type in the following (leaving a space between each word): stress reduc* workplace

2. Click Search

How many results did you find?

Refining Your Results to Full Text

Because this is a health topic and we have so many results, let’s try refining these results to full text only and with a publication date within the last two years.

1. In the left-hand navigation bar under Refine Results, click the box next to Full Text

2. Slide the Publication Date so that it reads from 2013-2015

How many results did you get when applying the full-text and publication date options?

Refining Your Results to Magazines

You still have a lot of results. Let’s narrow those results to popular magazine articles.

In the left-hand navigation bar under Source Types, click the box next to Magazines

Now, you should have less than 25 full-text popular magazine articles on your topic. As you learned in Part 1, you can access the full-text articles by clicking on the links for either PDF Full Text or HTML Full Text to see the article. Once you have one of the articles open look to see what Tools are available to you (located to the far right on your screen).

Conclusion

You have completed this tutorial and learned how to find full-text scholarly and popular articles in Academic Search Premier (ASP) while discovering a few of the search techniques and features to refine your results.

We encourage you to spend some time to try out more features searching for content on topics that interest you. Take a look at the left-hand navigation bar in your search results, for instance. And try narrowing your search in a variety of ways or try out the advanced search.

If you have questions about this tutorial or any one of the ELM databases, please contact us.