Student Resources In Context

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Introduction

In this tutorial, you will practice searching Student Resources In Context database which is specifically designed for middle and high school students. You’ll experience search scenarios that highlight the content and search features of Student Resources In Context.

Use the arrows below to navigate sequentially through the tutorial or use the Contents button above to skip between sections.

Scenario 1

A high school student is researching Alice Walker's The Color Purple.  He needs to find background information, scholarly articles, critical analysis.

There are three ways to search Student Resources In Context.

  • Basic Search
  • Advanced Search
  • Browse Topics
Scan the homepage to review these search options.
 
For this first scenario, let's start with a Basic Search.
 
1) Locate the Basic Search box in the upper right corner of the screen.
 
2) Type Color Purple (leaving out the word "the") in the Basic Search box.  Then, click Search.
 
The search result should yield a Topic page on the book, The Color Purple.
 
On this page you will find a variety of content types.  Scan and explore the page.
 

The high school student stated that he needed background information, scholarly articles, and critical analysis.  Which of the following categories would you click on from this result page to locate these three different article types?

 
Let's try another search scenario.
 

Scenario 2

A middle school student is researching Japanese-American Internment for her History Day project.  Specifically, she is looking for images and primary sources.  Can you help her find these items?
 
For this second scenario, let's start with an Advanced Search.
 
Since there are specific content types (images, primary sources) requested, the Advanced Search will help with limiting the search results to those items.
 
1) Click on the Advanced Search link located directly below the Basic Search box.
 
2) In the first search box type in Japanese-American Internment.
 
3) Scroll down.  Under the Content Type select Primary Sources and Images.  Then, click on the Search button.
 

How many results of each content type did you retrieve?

 
Let's try one more search scenario.
 

Scenario 3

A high school student is participating in a group project exploring the topic of immigration within the U.S. and looking for current resources with a present-day perspective.  Can you help him identify some resources that might be helpful in getting started on his research?
 
For this third scenario, let's start with Browse Topics.
 
1) Click on the Browse Topics link located in the black banner at the top of the screen.
 
 
2) Scan the list of topics and locate the topic Immigration.  When you find the topic, click on it.
 

The high school student stated that he needed current resources with a present-day perspective on Immigration.  Which of the following categories would you click on from this result page to locate these types of resources?

 
Select one of the news articles and click on the title to see the full text.
 
Scan the full text article page to see what features are available.
 
From this page you can print, email, bookmark, share on social media, translate, and listen to the article.
 
 
 
 
 

Conclusion

You have completed this tutorial and gained a practical understanding of Student Resources In Context database which is specifically designed for middle and high school students.

We encourage you to spend more time exploring Student Resources In Context database and its variety of features with topics that interest you.

If you have questions about this tutorial or any one of the ELM databases, please contact us.

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